A
Burkhard Beschow, 'Holes' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
B
No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
C
No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
D
Alexander Endrullat, 'Unibody' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
E
Alexander Endrullat, 'Unibody' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
F
Burkhard Beschow, 'Holes' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
G
Burkhard Beschow, 'Holes' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
H
Camilla Steinum, 'Toiletpaper' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
I
Camilla Steinum, 'Toiletpaper' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
J
Dorota Gaweda + Eglé Kulbokaité, '#CaptiveCEOsToBeReturnedToTheWild' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
K
Dorota Gaweda + Eglé Kulbokaité, '#CaptiveCEOsToBeReturnedToTheWild' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
L
Dorota Gaweda + Eglé Kulbokaité, '#CaptiveCEOsToBeReturnedToTheWild' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
M
Jake Kent, 'Dropping the A Bomb' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
N
Jake Kent, 'Hanging out in someone else´s puddle' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
O
Jake Kent, 'Hanging out in someone else´s puddle' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
P
Jake Kent, 'Hanging out in someone else´s puddle', 'Dropping the A Bomb' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
Q
Kai Hügel, 'Iced Fire Jelly Fish' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
R
Kai Hügel, 'Iced Fire Jelly Fish' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
S
Kai Hügel, 'Iced Herbs' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
T
Kai Hügel, 'Iced Herbs' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
U
Kai Hügel, 'Iced Herbs' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
V
Michele Gabriele, 'SHITTY-SLIPPY-SLUTTY (A beautiful and dangerous night)' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
W
Michele Gabriele, 'SHITTY-SLIPPY-SLUTTY (A beautiful and dangerous night)' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
X
Michele Gabriele, 'SHITTY-SLIPPY-SLUTTY (A beautiful and dangerous night)' (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
Y
No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
Z
No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
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No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
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No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
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No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.

No Need to Hunt @ S T O R E (2015) exhibition photos

, 26 February 2016

Group exhibition, No Need to Hunt – We Just Wait for the Roadkill curated by Paul Barsch brought together the work of eight artists at Dresden’s S T O R E from September 26 to October 10, 2015. Inanimate sculptures and objects sit quietly in conversation with one another; their potential power as vehicles of speech feels fragile and self aware. The accompanying text, and this segment in particular, is integral to the reading of the exhibition:

/fresh meat with zero exhaustion/ is not exactly true, at least it shouldn’t be. Immaterial labour is real labour and going beyond just looking and repeating requires precision and focus. Laid back is fine, but remember, I scroll too and I can see if you’ve been lazy; in fact, I want to see you exhausted.
But in the back of our minds, always: how fresh is this roadkill anyway?

No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.

The show’s installation photos capture Kai Hügel‘s ‘Iced Herbs’ as they begin to thaw. LED lights and various vietnamese herbs emerge from within the frozen casing. A light leak begins to permeate the floor, moistening Dorota GawedaEglé Kulbokaité‘s deteriorating aubergine skins. Dotted at random around the room and dissected in half, the vegetables lay splayed out over a hashtag text piece stuck to the floor that reads “CaptiveCEOsToBeReturnedToTheWild”. Michele Gabriele‘s ‘SHITTY-SLIPPY-SLUTTY (A beautiful and dangerous night)’, sits firmly in relation to the rest of the light and somewhat ephemeral works. The crystallised body sits somewhere between a rock formation you might see in a cave and an oversized piece of quartz used for spiritual healing. The pigment mixes with the surrounding moisture, dying the floor blue and purple. Protruding from the side, a PREDATOR knife sticks out from the sculpture’s gut.

Similar in size and shape, Burkhard Beschow‘s ‘Holes’ feels skeletal in relation. Wire, metal parts and cloth are tangled in a violent mess. The letter ‘E’, among other unidentifiable pieces of debris, is suspended in some sort of barbed wire trapping. Jake Kent‘s ‘Dropping the A Bomb’ and ‘Hanging out in someone else’s puddle’ pile political slogans in a heap on the floor. Silk screen patches yelling “DESTROY EVERYTHING” and “KILL YOUR INNER COP” are sewn into the digital prints and silk viscose velvet. The handmade tassels have a tender quality, bringing to mind the lengthy and invested form of obscure labour within activism. Alexander Endrullat‘s ‘Unibody’ places a MacBook on a step and in safe distance from the damp floor. Plugged in and fully charged,  it has been permanently welded shut and rendered a completely useless object.

On the other side of the room, a printed text winds around a roll of toilet paper by Camilla Steinum. With some difficulty, bits and pieces can be read: “Dirt comes out via the mouth…again and again unprocessed and embarrassing…trying to find meaning…the words, worlds.” The print feels strongly connected to the accompanying text, stringing the exhibition together by a thread of poetic-manifesto styled musings.**

Exhibition photos, top right.

No Need to Hunt – We Just Wait for the Roadkill was on at Dresden’s STORE from September 26 to October 10, 2015.

Header image: Jake Kent, ‘Hanging out in someone else´s puddle’, ‘Dropping the A Bomb’ (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.

LOCOMOTION @ STORE, May 2 – 4

28 April 2014

Group exhibition, No Need to Hunt – We Just Wait for the Roadkill curated by Paul Barsch brought together the work of eight artists at Dresden’s S T O R E from September 26 to October 10, 2015. Inanimate sculptures and objects sit quietly in conversation with one another; their potential power as vehicles of speech feels fragile and self aware. The accompanying text, and this segment in particular, is integral to the reading of the exhibition:

/fresh meat with zero exhaustion/ is not exactly true, at least it shouldn’t be. Immaterial labour is real labour and going beyond just looking and repeating requires precision and focus. Laid back is fine, but remember, I scroll too and I can see if you’ve been lazy; in fact, I want to see you exhausted.
But in the back of our minds, always: how fresh is this roadkill anyway?

No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.
No Need to Hunt — We Just Wait for the Roadkill (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.

The show’s installation photos capture Kai Hügel‘s ‘Iced Herbs’ as they begin to thaw. LED lights and various vietnamese herbs emerge from within the frozen casing. A light leak begins to permeate the floor, moistening Dorota GawedaEglé Kulbokaité‘s deteriorating aubergine skins. Dotted at random around the room and dissected in half, the vegetables lay splayed out over a hashtag text piece stuck to the floor that reads “CaptiveCEOsToBeReturnedToTheWild”. Michele Gabriele‘s ‘SHITTY-SLIPPY-SLUTTY (A beautiful and dangerous night)’, sits firmly in relation to the rest of the light and somewhat ephemeral works. The crystallised body sits somewhere between a rock formation you might see in a cave and an oversized piece of quartz used for spiritual healing. The pigment mixes with the surrounding moisture, dying the floor blue and purple. Protruding from the side, a PREDATOR knife sticks out from the sculpture’s gut.

Similar in size and shape, Burkhard Beschow‘s ‘Holes’ feels skeletal in relation. Wire, metal parts and cloth are tangled in a violent mess. The letter ‘E’, among other unidentifiable pieces of debris, is suspended in some sort of barbed wire trapping. Jake Kent‘s ‘Dropping the A Bomb’ and ‘Hanging out in someone else’s puddle’ pile political slogans in a heap on the floor. Silk screen patches yelling “DESTROY EVERYTHING” and “KILL YOUR INNER COP” are sewn into the digital prints and silk viscose velvet. The handmade tassels have a tender quality, bringing to mind the lengthy and invested form of obscure labour within activism. Alexander Endrullat‘s ‘Unibody’ places a MacBook on a step and in safe distance from the damp floor. Plugged in and fully charged,  it has been permanently welded shut and rendered a completely useless object.

On the other side of the room, a printed text winds around a roll of toilet paper by Camilla Steinum. With some difficulty, bits and pieces can be read: “Dirt comes out via the mouth…again and again unprocessed and embarrassing…trying to find meaning…the words, worlds.” The print feels strongly connected to the accompanying text, stringing the exhibition together by a thread of poetic-manifesto styled musings.**

Exhibition photos, top right.

No Need to Hunt – We Just Wait for the Roadkill was on at Dresden’s STORE from September 26 to October 10, 2015.

Header image: Jake Kent, ‘Hanging out in someone else´s puddle’, ‘Dropping the A Bomb’ (2015) Install view. Courtesy S T O R E, Dresden.

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