Ivana Basic @ Annka Kultys reviewedMr. & Mrs. Philip Cath @ Almanac reviewedAn interview with Berry PattenA memorandum for Where is Ana Mendieta?Muriel Leray, <i>Obscene</i> (2016) exhibition photosGeorgia Gardner Gray @ ACUD reviewedTrisha Baga @ Société reviewedPsychiatry + the State according to Josh Bitelli + Pil and Galia KollectivIntroducing ssaliva with a premiere of ‘spellbound’An interview with Takeshi MurataLooking dimly forward with <i>Comedy Club 2</i>An extract of ‘Flood’ by Susu Laroche/New NovetaRebecca Peel @ Kimberly-Klark reviewedConvening with Black Women Artists for Black Lives MatterSaying goodbye to Lisa Cooley w Jeff WitscherZadie Xa @ Serpentine Galleries reviewedIntroducing Oxhy with a mix for aqnbAlex Turgeon @ Center reviewedPicking through Gold Press’ <i>Pleasure Principle</i>Valinia Svoronou @ Frankfurt am Main reviewed

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  • The nape of the neck, a jagged rib, flesh that could once have been a hand, the nub of a heel, oscillating between foetal and decaying. The figures in Serbian artist Ivana Basic’s solo show Throat Wanders Down the Blade, running at Annka Kultys September 7 to October 8, are caught between becoming and unbecoming, stepping in and out of interiority.

    The show is based on the voice of Basic’s alter ego, ‘Bridle’, and features a series of seven blown glass bubbles mounted and scattered around the walls of the room, titled ‘Breath seeps through her tightly closed mouth #1-#7′. Suggestive of air being squeezed out…

  • The promo shot for Mr. & Mrs. Philip Cath and lovers pictures a bare back ‘Phil’ laying over a naked canvas, photo taken by his wife Khloe —both of married artist duo known as the titular Mr. & Mrs. Philip Cath. The pair, who routinely display and inject their relationship (and children) into their practice, present various aspects of their personal life fluidly across a variety of media. For their latest exhibition at London’s Almanac, running September 2 to 24, the focus shifts toward a holistic understanding of their work; a warm acknowledgement of the messy and multi-directional web of ‘lovers’ that provide a…

  • For Berry Patten, dialectics and the nature of spaces are important. Her personal relationships are a source of inspiration for her work, in order to open up discussions around affectivity, networks and security infrastructures. As is often the case in this modern era, where a shared space for meeting is often hard to find, Patten talks to me from her computer —by Skype, then by phone. We’re speaking in advance of her new commission called and through the roof we hit the ceiling for this year’s Deptford X Festival, a yearly project that takes place in the London borough of Lewisham, running September 23 to October 2 and enabling a select group…

  • Global activist group Where is Ana Mendieta? staged another action on Sunday, September 18 at Berlin’s Hamburger Bahnhof. It was one carried out in  memory of the titular Cuban-born artist Ana Mendieta best known for her earth-body works, who fell to her death in September 1985 at the age of 36. Since then, feminist demonstrators have been protesting institutions through direct actions and ‘cry-ins’ for exhibiting the work of her husband at the time, Carl Andre, who was charged and controversially acquitted of her murder following the incident. According to the group, the institutional world has ignored the contention surrounding Mendieta’s death, while also…

  • Muriel Leray presented solo exhibition Obscene at Paris’s Galerie Escougnou-Cetraro which ran from February 6 to March 3, 2016.
    The Paris-based artist frames her work within a text she wrote that is provided in the press release. The title reads, “To protect and entertain. For this year, and more specifically the one to come” and carries on into a lengthy narrative… the dynamic seems to show a reality, there are no ruined monuments, the entry making time a binding. Without binding, in the decor work is with certainty starter for a narrative…” 
    The installation consists of wood frames, black cardboard, glass, vinyl lettering, chairs and a bench that make up a delicate and minimal…

  • In his most famous work on aesthetics, The Poetics, Aristotle argues that for a drama to be effective it must display “unity of time”; the events depicted in the narrative must take place over no more than twenty-four hours. Viewing Georgia Gardner Gray’s play Schaumstoff Laden in the crowded courtyard of Berlin’s ACUD, it’s surprising how much the work connects to this classical notion, but, of course, with a twist. Rather like La Nouvelle Vague director Jean-Luc Goddard’s famous observation that while a film may need a beginning, a middle and an end, they need not occur in exactly that order, Gray’s play is…