Ed Fornieles @ Chisenhale Gallery reviewedA walk through <i>EDENunlimited/tbc.tbc</i>An interview with Metahaven<i>(networked) EVERY WHISPER IS A CRASH ON MY EARS</i> reviewedAram Bartholl, <i>Hurt me plenty</i> (2014) exhibition photosBerlin Art Week highlights: Marguerite Humeau + Kate CooperAnne de Vries, <i>THE OIL WE EAT</i> (2014) exhibition photosHannah Perry @ Serpentine Galleries reviewedReading Ryan Trecartin’s <i>SITE VISIT</i> @ KW<i>Neither</i> @ Seventeen Gallery reviewedTakeshi Shiomitsu @ Happy Times reviewedA mix from Extasis RecordsSome highlights from <i>Space-Time</i> festivalMorag Keil @ Project Native Informant reviewedFabienne Hess, <i>Replica Sentiments</i> (2014) exhibition photos<i>Tabularium</i> @ Slopes reviewedSALT. Issue 6: <i>Manifesto</i> reviewedAn interview with Sophia Al-Maria<i>Stoneroses</i> w/ Center @ Grunewald reviewedAn interview with Iain Ball

Latest

  • Walking into the Ed Fornieles Modern Family show at the Chisenhale Gallery is like being transported to a cartoonish version of American suburbia complete with barbeques, picnic tables, Jacuzzis and vibrating beds. As an expansive and complex installation, it takes a while to adjust to the hip-hop thud ricocheting off the walls, the dimmed and flashing lighting, and the plasma screens displaying random images appropriated in real time from the internet. Littered with ephemera associated with family life and domesticity, it resembles a home post civil war.
    The exhibition is LA- and London-based artist Fornieles’s first solo show in a UK institution. Enacting a collapse between the virtual and…

  • In the sparsely furnished, dimly lit hall on the third floor of an enormous dilapidated house, bed frames are loosely arranged around ornate plaster columns in irregular rows. The reference to an orphanage, or a dormitory is immediate and obvious, yet the recurrence of digital printing and a wall-mounted flat screen brings your thoughts back to the Berlin art scene.
    EDENunlimited/tbc.tbc is a collaborative project by artists Clémence de La Tour du Pin andAntoine Renard and the curators Elise Lammer and Emiliano Pistacchi. It pulls together sound and installation works of 19 artist from 13 contributing not-for-profit spaces. The show holds a strong aesthetic reference to Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster‘s TH.2058 show,…

  • It’s appropriate that I’m talking to Metahaven on PiratePad. Having pushed for Skype and settling for ‘chat’, Daniel van der Velden – with creative partner Vinca Kruk always cc’d into email – sends a link to a ‘Hello!’ on the online etherpad doc, the design agency’s answers highlighted pink, to my green, in what is a last-minute interview graciously granted and swiftly started within a day of the suggestion. It’s a real-time conversation as both ends multitask – answering, waiting, working, searching for links – with van der Velden occasionally poking fun, once bluntly retorting, “is this an attempt at an art school examination?”…

  • “(ò_óˇ)” marks an appropriate end to the strain of excess that (networked) EVERY WHISPER IS A CRASH ON MY EARS embodies. Stamped on the empty last page of the anthology published by London’s Arcadia Missa and featuring contributions by 45 artists from around the (digitised) world, it tracks a six-month exhibition programme of the same name and a surplus of extra material. Press releases, installation photos, film stills, essays, artist interviews, prose, poetry, emails; these are scattered across 300+ pages of information that eschews a single-channel stream of content in favour of the more realistic overload of its stated ‘networked’ culture. Snubbing any conventional…

  • The impossible desire of breaching the screen is a standard motif of much contemporary art concerned with the ‘digital’ and fixated on the ‘digits’. For Berlin-based artist Aram Bartholl, though, that’s a desire that’s not only possible but already realised via the early ‘first-person shooters’ of archaic video games. Taking its title from a player level of 1993 harbinger to VR violence, DOOM, Hurt me plenty – running at  DAM Gallery September 12 to November 14 – lingers at the halfway point between ‘I’m too young to die’ and ‘Nightmare!’.
    Representing said reach into virtual space via the pixelated hands holding guns of these Duke…

  • Alone and in silence is the perfect way to see Marguerite Humeau’s latest exhibition at Import Projects and I just got lucky, I guess, shuffling into the gallery as it closed and walking undisturbed through the whole brilliant spectacle. But what can words do to describe Humeau’s Horizons? Language falls flat when passions soar, and awe was the only emotion I could concretely feel walking through the haunting three-room installation. All too often, the story behind an exhibition ends up more fascinating than the work itself, the two appearing to have little in common, as though the true artist was the person responsible for the press…