An interview with Kate Sansom<i>INFO PURA</i> @ The Residence Gallery reviewedAn interview Sanna Helena BergerBorna Sammak @ American Medium reviewedPremiering Celyn June’s <i>Location</i>An interview with Keren CytterBerlin Biennale 2016 reviewedSarah M Harrison’s <i>All The Things</i> reviewedSeeing + being seen by Vika Kirchenbauer’s ‘COOL FOR YOU’The <i>Rare Earth</i> catalogue reviewedTaking comfort in v1984’s <i>Becoming (N)one</i>Hypercapitalist East-Asia: how accelerationists make future-fuelIntroducing Dane Law w a mix for <i>aqnb</i>Listening back to <i>No Screening</i><i>default</i> @ Honor Fraser reviewed‘Unthinkable’ w The Pitch + J.G. Biberkopf May 14 mixNew Noveta @ Sandy Brown reviewedAn interview with Eric Oglander<i>Unstable Monuments</i> in Truro reviewed<i>Multiple Choice Double Happiness</i> (2016) documentation

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  • Humans Unite, a solo show by Kitty Clark at new London space, Public Exhibitions ran May 27 – June 12, 2016. Curated by Valentina Fois, the show presented a new series of works by Clark that address futile desires and contemporary anxiety through what Fois describes as “a transhuman mentality”.
    It’s comprised of mainly sculptural pieces featuring materials and arrangements such as aluminium, etched text onto acrylic, dead flies, and laminate. Some air vents with printed text look to be providing air to an empty see-through chamber that acts as an arm rest for an animatronic hand perched, armless on top. A large-scale digitally projected 3D virtual environment of a ‘Wheatfield (FEEL KNOW)’ presents Humans…

  • Never Land Alone, a two person show by Jack Lavender and Isaac Lythgoe ran from January 23 through February 27 in the mezzanine room of Paris’ Eric Hussenot. Organised by project space Exo Exo, the show and the space acted out a journey into what Lythgoe describes as “fantasy living”, realised as something of a scripted shrine.
    With various items scattered across the room, occupying floor placements, ceiling spots and spaces that are made into thresholds, the hierarchies of installation seem muddled and it is at once immersive. The items in the duo’s environment include a novelty beer mug from ‘PARIS’, a bed headboard with an image of 90s film character The…

  • It’s probably worth noting, in the context of her current show, that Kate Sansom’s Instagram is set to private. Her exhibition, Assets, is on at London’s Rowing, running May 27 to June 25. The gallery is a white space tucked into a nice little mews near Kentish Town tube station; I arrive in the sun in a sweat. I catch Sansom as she breaks her journey –recently landed after a break in Berlin, she is flying back to Canada, where she is based, the next day. I know her Instagram is set to private because the night before we met I followed her, hoping to…

  • There’s a lot happening in the rather small space of London’s The Residence Gallery. With video work and wearable sculptures, colourful engraved acrylic and an Oculus Rift that holds almost pride of place in the centre of the floorspace, the INFO PURA group exhibition, running June 3 to 26, presents an overlaying of media that sit comfortably with the show’s theme. Curated by Ed Leezon, it’s one prompted by an engagement with psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, who is quoted in the press release suggesting that “nothing that has once come into existence will have passed away and all the earlier phases of development continue to exist alongside the last one”.
    Ideas of…

  • Ben Elliot’s solo exhibition tbh i dunno if i have feelings was on at Paris’ Very Art Space, running January 22 to 30, 2016. It was curated by Artagon and focusses on what the artist calls “the dematerialized era in relation existence”. Presenting different formats and forms of work, from a social media invitation to physical artworks made of polycarbonate, bottles from the opening and private feelings written on filmy plates, Elliot creates an interconnected set of objects and reflections.
    The show is the first in a cycle of events about contemporary concerns at the gallery, where the artist highlights what might be called post-capitalism…

  • Sanna Helena Berger’s work is difficult to define. You could call it ‘performance’ but that doesn’t quite do it justice. Hovering between institutional critique and a dissection of the intimate, the Swedish artist takes these two apparently antonymic subjects and makes them meet inside the white cube. For a solo at Oslo’s Diorama called The edge must be scalloped Berger built a room in the exhibition space guarded by invigilators. Upon entering, the public was presented with a minimal dining room with a mirror on one wall. On closer examination, it reveals itself as mirrored glass with a replica of the settings in which the viewer is standing on the other side, making them acutely aware of their context; of viewing…