Martin Kohout: ‘Figures’, p.1Tyra Tingleff + <i>Ströme</i> (2015) exhibition photosAnticipating Sounds like…An interview with Holly HerndonLisa Holzer @ Rowing reviewedUSC 1st year MFA class drops out<i>Fenêtre Project</i> (2015) exhibition photosAA Bronson in conversationChez Deep: Four Walls, p.1Introducing HARD-CORE’s <i>Asahi 4.0</i><i>Looks</i> @ ICA reviewedAn interview with Ivana Basic<i>K.I.S.S.</i> @ Generation & Display reviewedIntroducing Artyčok.tvAn interview with Fannie SosaMenna Cominetti, <i>Woozee</i> (2015) exhibition photos<i>After The Eclipse</i> @ Flutgraben e.V. reviewedAda Karczmarczyk: ‘Medium’, p.1Steven Warwick, <i>REENGINEERING VILLA AURORA</i> (2015) audioMonira Al Qadiri: Portraits of the End of the World, p.2

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  • “Sometimes you get fascinated by the object that represents”, says Martin Kohout about the inspiration behind his work. Speaking to George Michelle for our fifth video in the Money Makes the World Go ‘Round series, the Czech-born, Berlin-based artist explains why he started his own publishing house and how he now wants to move away from the idea of images and artefacts as symbolic.
    In Part One of two titled ‘Figures’, Kohout reveals the motives behind recent publications hosted by TLTRPreß (TooLongToReadPress), like Linear Manual and Sleep Cures Sleepiness, as offering a path through its invited contributors’ often complex unpickings of contemporary culture. For example, stick becomes a jumping-off point for exploring modes of decentralised power and…

  • Showing alongside and in parallel with each other at Birsfelden’s SALTS between January 31 and March 13, a solo exhibition by Tyra Tingleff and a joint one by Gina Folly and Mandla Reuter are connected by their position in relation to movement, or lack there of. With a press release subtitled ‘Timeless’, Tingleff’s Closer Scrub is neither about emptiness, nor is it motionless. Within her impressionist paintings hung across two white-walled rooms, there is a variation in brightness, hue and saturation, that speaks to a layering of events. Time can be ceased and compressed with a huge number of episodes, images and information; each scratched and tortured…

  • The future is without body, in the most literal sense. In an age of growing totalitarian surveillance states feeding off an increasingly hyper-represented public, to be bodiless is to be free. The digital arena provides a test pilot for this kind of freedom with all its unrestrained depravity and joy, the rehearsal stage for a future in which we are not merely the sum of our parts. But for now, the most we can do is play at it, as Ivana Basic says in a recent interview with aqnb, or play with it, as Hannah Black does in another. The disappearing body, however, is appearing all around us.

    Sounds like… is not…

  • “Are you doing anything internet-intensive right now?” Holly Herndon asks through Skype as she struggles with a new internet connection from her latest base in Los Angeles. The US-born but fairly peripatetic producer can’t hear, typing words into the chat window saying she’s only getting every second syllable. She heaves and grunts to give an impression of how it sounds, and it’s not unlike the hyperventilating whoops and howls of a song like ‘Chorus’. It’s the track that follows the first, ‘Interference’, on her second album Platform – out on RVNG Intl and 4AD on May 19 – and it’s one that explores the intimate relationship between a person and…

  • ‘Hello, I’m here’, or ‘Hi, this is what I’m doing,’ is a remark that Berlin and Vienna-based artist Lisa Holzer’s work implies , making itself at home inside your stomach and your head. There is a transparency with which this work conducts itself like in Holzer’s recent performance for the opening of I Did Love You Once at Vienna’s Galerie Emanuel Layr where she a) cooks spaghetti, b) lays a piece of it out on the ‘transparent but milky surface’, stroking it like a single strand of hair and c) photographs it with a large, intended flash. The flash and the spaghetti together feels like…

  • First year students Julie Beaufils, Sid Duenas, George Egerton-­Warburton, Edie Fake, Lauren Davis Fisher, Lee Relvas and Ellen Schafer have left the University of Southern California’s Roski School of Art and Design MFA programme in protest amid allegations of a retroactively dismantled funding model and drastic changes to the existing faculty structure and curriculum.
    Here’s their statement:
    “We are a group of seven artists who made the decision to attend USC Roski School of Art and
    Design’s MFA program based on the faculty, curriculum, program structure and funding
    packages. We are a group of seven artists who have been forced by the School’s actions
    dismantling each of these elements to dissolve our…

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