<i>Alternative Equinox</i>: Das Hund mini-EP mix<i>One step ahead moving backwards</i> @ LEAP reviewedAn overview of Frieze 2014 on the fringe<i>Associations New</i> @ SALTS (2014) exhibition photosBunny Rogers, Hannah Black + the ‘Unusuble Chaire’Pauline Beaudemont, <i>L’Age d’Or</i> (2014) exhibition photosFIAC 2014 reviewedVisuals from Project/Number I/P/1, P/N/21 and L/B/16An interview with 18+An interview with Maja CulePaul Kneale, <i>SEO and Co.</i> (2014) exhibition photos + vidFrieze London 2014 reviewedPetra Cortright @ Société reviewed<i>The Mycological Twist</i> (2014) installation photosThe Making of <i>Same Same</i><i>Genuine Articles</i> (2014) exhibition photos<i>Schizo-Culture</i> + semiotext(e): then and now<i>Union</i> (2014) @ Union Pacific exhibition photosAn interview with Megan RooneyDean Blunt’s <i>New Paintings</i> @ [ space ] reviewed

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  • Multi-disciplinary artists and collaborators Samuel Levack & Jennifer Lewandowski will be launching a moving image and architectural installation in Bethnal Green, running November 25 to 30,  upstairs in their storefront gallery French Riviera. As a shared space that also doubles as a studio and once even tripled as the artists’ residence, it’s an all-too-familiar emblem of the resourcefulness required to keep afloat in a city as expensive as London. In responding to the tightening noose of property development and corporate crawl, Alternative Equinox pays tribute to the artist’s former home while exploring their contemporary socio-political context through personal experience as artists living in the…

  • Time and how it manifests in art is a key theme of a 14-page, print-only written exchange between curatorial project km temporaer‘s Elisa R. Linn and Lenart Wolff and curator Hicham Khalidi. It forms the basis of the One step ahead moving backward group exhibition held at Berlin’s LEAP, running October 31 to November 22 and features solo and collaborative works from 12 contributors, including Andreas Greiner, Armin Keplinger, Wolfgang Laib and Paolo Thorsen-Nagel among others. The outcome is an eclectic exhibition of art and artist ideas made up of disparate, at times conflicting elements that somehow coagulate under the notions of contemporary artwork…

  • “The ceiling’s fallen down here”, says Emma Siemens-Adolphe while clearing up a small pile of fallen debris at the corner of the floor at Jupiter Woods’ Genuine Articles. I’m warned it’s not part of the exhibition on entry but, regardless of it being an incidental, I think it kind of is. As one of the best of many good things orbiting the opulent centre of Frieze London 2014 in mid-October, it’s an indication of the glaring economic inequalities between spaces that sometimes, but not always, become a fairly accurate gauge of how good a gallery’s going to be. The Barnie Page-curated show is in the two-storey space in a largely industrial suburb…

  • An 18th-century bourgeois salon-hang for the 21st-century privilege of art production. The material parallels between the seemingly long-outdated practice of showing off a painting collection to friends and business associates in the semi-private surounds of a French living room and the nature of art display via a desktop are uncannily similar. That’s something curators Samuel Leuenberger and Elise Lammer picked up on with “cluster hung painting show” Associations New at Birsfelden’s SALTS, running from October 4 to December 8.
    Associations New (2014) a cluster hung painting show @ SALTS. Installation view. Photos by Gunnar Meier. Courtesy the gallery.
    Featuring the work of 25 artists from their…

  • Bunny Rogers‘ voice is unmistakable. Often described as flat or monotone, it is also sublimely expressive. At the opening of her solo exhibition, Columbine Library, at Société in July, Bunny launched Cunny Vol 1, an archive of the poetry she published on her Tumblr, Cunny Poem from 2012-2014. Downstairs from the exhibition space, in a grimy, empty flat, Bunny read from Cunny as if her words bore an unbearable weight. They visibly dragged her down so that by the end of each poem she seems to have to scoop herself back up before beginning the next. She reminds me of a character from a…

  • As one of two exhibitions showing concurrently at Birsfelden’s SALTS, Geneva-based artist Pauline Beaudemont‘s L’Age D’or takes its name from Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí’s 1930 “surrealist comedy” of the same name. It’s a film that ends on an allusion to De Sade’s 120 Days of Sodom, a Libertine fiction that celebrates hedonism at all costs by the author from which ‘sadism’ takes its very name. In Beaudemont’s exhibition the theme takes on a more modern turn, if not literally for its fixation on the modernist architecture that reached critical mass when L’Age D’Or was still inciting riots, then for the line that it draws…