<i>The Garden</i> @ Room E-10 27 (2016) exhibition photos<i>BRONDE. It’s not blonde…</i> (2016) exhibition photosAn interview with Maxwell Sterling<i>Networking the Unseen</i> @ Furtherfield Gallery reviewedJesse Wine, <i>Wonderful Audience Member</i> (2016) exhibition photosAn interview with Deanna HavasMark Delong @ Cooper Cole reviewedLooking back at Brexit with Wolfgang Tillmans<i>WACKing the Piñata</i> @ ltd los angeles reviewedSophia Al-Maria @ Whitney Museum reviewedConcerning <i>MC: Emerging Artist</i>Johannes Paul Raether: When life echoes artTony Hope @ Jessica Silverman reviewedLooking at failure and existence at Hester + JTT galleryPremiering <i>Sad Girls Club TV</i>: Season 4, Episode 1Loney Abrams + Johnny Stanish @ Knockdown Center reviewed‘Accessing Economies’: an <i>AQNB</i> x Video in Common screening rundownAn interview with Femke HerregravenLooking back at Liverpool Biennial 2016Trevor Shimizu @ 47 Canal reviewed

Latest

  • Curated by Thomas Butler and Anna Solal, The Garden group exhibition was on at Paris’ ROOM E-10 27  and ran from February 11 until March 4, 2016.
    The show was based at an offsite project at the Cité des Arts and featured work by artists Bianca Bondi, Joel Dean, Cédric Fargues, Bea Fremderman, Timothy Furey, Frieder Haller, Rosie Hastings & Hannah Quinlan, Leslie Martinelli, Anna Sagström, Pepo Salazar, Fabio Santacroce and Anna Solal.
    Spanning sculpture, video-as-readymade, readymades-as-sculpture, photography and a site-specific sculpture/installation, the show brought together works that address collaboration by using the fertile metaphor of the garden, touching upon the urgency of creation and the making of new bonds in an arid and…

  • The BRONDE. It’s not blonde. It’s not brunette. It’s somewhere (really pretty) in between group exhibition was on in Milan on the ground floor of a beauty Salon called Orea Malià, running February 11 to March 3, 2016. Curated by UTTER Collective, the show featured works by Ann Hirsch, Molly Soda and Tabita Rezaire. It is the first project supported by Fiori; a soon to be launched platform that seeks to create occasions of dialogue and confrontation between art, research and activism.
    Analysing the social and political implications that new technologies have on gender, representation and mass culture, the exhibition guided the viewer through a journey by sharing common aesthetics and sensitivities.
    Using Tablets and TV screens, the…

  • The original artwork accompanying Maxwell Sterling’s ‘Hollywood Medieval’ featured the British-born Los Angeles-based producer taking a selfie in the reflection of a window looking into the garish interior of a Psychic Store on Sunset Boulevard. It’s a picture that captures the sense of a space that the Manchester-born, Leeds-educated musician and composer does with sound. His first album, also called Hollywood Medieval and released on LA label Memory No. 36 Recordings, features seven songs inspired by and made up of layers —layers of iPhone recordings and analogue synthesisers, layers of simulated string sections and choral patches; car horns, bird song, traffic, an uncanny voice describing the theology of a New Age religion. Together they’re moulded into urgent and…

  • Showing at Furtherfield Gallery between June 18 and August 14, Networking the Unseen claims to be the “first exhibition of its kind to focus on the intersection of indigenous cultures and zeitgeist digital practices in contemporary art.” Focusing on Australian indigenous art making, especially in the remote community of Lajamanu and the Wanayaka Art Centre, Gretta Louw’s curated show argues that these two moments have too often been considered separately and that there is rich terrain to be discovered in bringing them into critical dialogue.
    The thematic tone is set early in an exhibition, which also includes work by Jenny Fraser, Sharon Nampijinpa Anderson and Brook Andrew, among others. Lilly…

  • Jesse Wine’s solo exhibition Wonderful Audience Member was on at Berlin’s Soy Capitán, running January 29 to April 2, 2016. It was invited by Melissa Canbaz and focusses on what the press calls “perceptions, and being open to perceptual processes.”. 

    Presenting sculpture and installation made from glazed ceramic, resin, fibreglass and wood, the show aims to suggest different forms of involvement and self-positioning through the gesture of invitation and a particularly dialogic approach. Here, the process of perception is applied as a conduit to achieving art, and this idea of the this vessel or mediator as being important as the final work: “the conduit is what liberates us”.**
    Jesse Wine, ‘Wonderful Audience Member – Invited by Melissa Canbaz‘ (2016), Exhibition…

  • When I go to meet Deanna Havas at London’s LD50 where here current exhibition Due Diligence is showing, the space is still set up from philosopher Nick Land’s talk that morning. All the chairs in the gallery are scattered with cigarette paraphernalia. I joke, has someone just been having one fag in each chair and moving on? She says very seriously, “yeah, it was me!”
    Usually, I ask interviewees if they’ll send me whatever they’d like me to see that can’t be found on the internet; in this case, it feels somewhat like a redundant question. It’s difficult to extricate Havas’ practice from her internet presence —oftentimes, they’re…

Elsewhere:

Twitter

Facebook