An interview with Beau Rice<i>Always Brian (TI AMO)</i> (2015) exhibition photosAn interview with Natalia Sielewicztransmediale 2015 reviewedViktor Timofeev’s <i>Proxyah v2</i> reviewedDenature, ‘out-scale’ (2015) audiovisual mix<i>C R A S H</i> (2015) @ New Scenario exhibition photosNoha Ramadan @ Tanztage 2015 reviewedIntroducing SW with their <i>SWAQNB</i> mixAn interview with Mat DryhurstHolly White, ‘Supermarket Cafe 2′ (2015) videoPakui Hardware, <i>Lost Heritage</i> (2015) exhibition photos<i>Sleep Cures Sleepiness</i> reviewedAntoine Renard, ‘pro.age’ (2014) video + photosSitting in the <i>City of God</i> : a review<i>Never Never Land</i> @ EOA.Projects reviewedJacques Gaspard Biberkopf, <i>Video</i> mixSophie Jung + Shana Moulton, <i>DOUBLE</i> (2014) exhibition photos<i>In the Clear, Caring, Curing</i> (2014) exhibition photosGili Tal, <i>Panoramic Views of the City</i> (2014) exhibition photos

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  • “The first time I masturbated was on the internet and I learned to recognise my desires”, says Beau Rice from his home in LA. He’s a 25-year-old first time author who’s written a book composed almost entirely of his private text messages. Published by Penny-Ante Editions, TEX includes Gmail subject headings and Google Docs, emails and emojiis (“ dildo in the corner”), some prose and a poem that literally looks like a butt plug, all centred around an endless discussion of sex, love and normativity.
    “Monogamy is a way of getting the versions of ourselves down to the minimum”, reads Rice through his webcam, from an…

  • Always Brian (TI AMO) owes its title to street art. The only evidence of an underground language exposed in the light of day, the words could mean a range of things, their semantics depending on any number of factors that are too many to quantify. It doesn’t stop people and their programmes from trying though, with linguistic inquiry and word count text analysis software (LIWC) being one of them. It’s this purported window into the “emotional and cognitive worlds” of any given social media user that provides an interesting launching point for this group exhibition. Organised by 63rd-77th STEPS and running January 16 to 18,…

  • “I love internet cafes,” says Natalia Sielewicz through a chuckle, “I have an unhealthy fascination with them”. The curator is in a coffee shop next to a converted furniture sales department store in PRL Poland, that is now, temporarily, the Museum of Modern Art Warsaw where she works. She’s just closed a huge four month programme of exhibitions, performances and talks by artists from around the world called Private Settings, Art After the Internet and if you’re familiar with the art, or just the miscellaneous cities that that art comes from, you’d certainly understand her enthusiasm for the public-private space of the online interface.
    It’s an…

  • “We have lost the game of the internet,” warns Peter Sunde. Recently released from jail, the former Pirate Bay founder speaks alongside other participants and organizers at the transmediale 2015,  commencement address. The opening presentation, as the next few days demonstrate, fittingly contextualises the idea between the opposing speeches of the BitTorrent spokesperson and Jennifer Lyn Morone. In contrast to Sunde’s warning to abdicate from digital media, as he has done, Morone briefly and somewhat nervously explains her project of incorporating her identity and data as a form of resistance. The year’s theme is ‘Capture All.’ It focuses on current trends and methods of…

  • “You are in this three-dimensional room”, says the exhibition sheet of Viktor Timofeev’s Proxyah v2 running at London’s Jupiter Woods from January 9 to February 8. It’s the first line of some rather complicated instructions outlining how its user should navigate the unstable CGI setting of the ‘Proxyah v2’ (2015) video game, screening on the left of a two-channel installation in the far-left corner of the Bermondsey space. The blue darkened room gives off the aura of being underwater, the staircase to the right and the sheet of fabric blocking the back kitchen effects an eerie sense of the parasitic. It’s as though this…

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