Brian Kokoska, <i>Poison IV</i> (2015) exhibition photosJustin Morin, <i>Q10</i> (2015) exhibition photosScenes from Paramount RanchContemplating <i>Electronic Superhighway</i>Chris Sharp + Ieva Epnere @ Kim ? exhibition photos<i>…and the soft ground in the garden…</i> (2015) exhibition photosJames Ferraro’s ‘Burning Prius’ reviewedWatching Maximilian Schmoetzer’s <i>Bird of the Year 2022</i>Doug Bowen, <i>Down in the Dumps</i> (2015) exhibition photos<i>Condo</i> 2016 reviewedClaire Tolan: ‘Thinking Systems (ASMR)’, p.2Walking through the work of Alona RodehGarrett Nelson @ Museo de la Ciudad de Querétaro reviewed<i>Little Metonym</i> (2015) exhibition photosIntroducing Kepla with a mix for <i>aqnb</i>Menna Cominetti + Sophie Lee, <i>Boy, ’12</i> (2015) exhibition photosReflecting on LCMF 2015Finding meaning on the Upper East Side: <i>Wet Eyes</i>Antoine Donzeaud @ DASH reviewed<i>National Gallery 2: Empire</i> @ Chewday’s reviewed

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  • Poison IV, a solo exhibition by New York-based artist Brian Kokoska, presented an installation of paintings, sculptures and found objects at Paris’s Galerie Valentin which took place from September 5 to October 10, 2015. Disparate elements of the fragmented self are scattered and forced into conversation with one another, housed within a shared chromatic logic of basic black and sickly green. The exhibition becomes a type of body rooted in symbolism and complicated by childhood emblems. The multi-directional reference points of the show set the tone for an experience that is both clinical and magical, inviting yet chilling.

    The swampy green and black paintings take on a basic abstract language. Large brush strokes and…

  • Q10 is an intricate network of energy-producing cells vital for the growth and maintenance of our bodies; a complex system one can barely understand when reading about it on wikipedia. A more realistic definition would point to the ubiquitous phrase of this borrowed scientific system that now exists as a reminder to moisturize and invest in the wellbeing of my skin.
    This directionless definition is appropriately used as the title for a solo exhibition by Paris based artist Justin Morin at Brussels’s Galerie Jeanroch Dard which took place from September 11 to October 24.
    Justin Morin, Q10 (2015). Exhibition view. Courtesy Jeanroch Dard, Brussels.
    The room is filled with colourfully printed silk hung from polished steel, among laser cut and…

  • Paul McCarthy’s inflatable butt plug, shunned by Paris, was in its true home rising between the mountains of the bushy Californian backcountry. Like a beacon it drew the art crowd to the Wild West film set town Paramount Ranch. An apt location for the Los Angeles art world to muster, depth of inquiry and the shimmering surface of market and social forces were indistinguishable. Either the set is convincing or there really is a saloon back there.
    But who said Los Angeles is trying to become any more contemplative about its art; being the perennially upcoming cultural paradise doesn’t necessitate round-tables and why would you…

  • In a bid to start 2016 with a big show, the Whitechapel gallery has put together a survey of over 100 artworks by more than 70 artists working with computer and internet technologies during the last 50 years. It’s called Electronic Superhighway (2016 – 1966), which sounds new and exciting, because it’s ‘about technology’. But the name also has a retro feel about it. Superhighway sounds a bit 70s. Indeed, the term was coined in 1974, by the artist Nam June Paik as a metaphor for the potentialities in a globalised world connected through technology. By choosing to name the show in such a way it allows the…

  • It was not just a poetic sensibility at play in the naming of show: An Archive of Stones, to be periodically activated, speculated upon, damaged and finally gilded with fiction—it is quite literally what it states it is. Curated by Chris Sharp, the project ran at Riga’s kim? Contemporary Art Centre from August 14 to September 27, 2015. Sharp invited ten artists, art critics, curators and philosophers—including Laura Prikule, Maija Rudovska and Kaspars Groševs—to guide the exhibition.

    The project, whose aim was to “address the use and significance of stones in contemporary art”, was neither exhibition nor lecture, having chosen instead to set itself up as “an…

  • Six artists get their direction from ‘mamelon’, the breast-like rock formation that takes shape as a volcano erupts through a narrow vent in the bedrock in …and the soft ground in the garden was also a constellation …, an exhibition curated by Angels Miralda.
    The group show, which ran at London’s Lychee One during Art Licks Weekend in 2015, locates its premise in the prolific grounds of the volcano, “one of the most fertile environments for plant growth as well as for the human imagination”. The artists each explore and anthropomorphise the literal state and figurative idea of ‘mamelon’ through varying mediums, with Alexandre Singh taking the…