Premiering <i>Sad Girls Club TV</i>: Season 4, Episode 1Loney Abrams + Johnny Stanish @ Knockdown Center reviewed‘Accessing Economies’: an <i>AQNB</i> x Video in Common screening rundownAn interview with Femke HerregravenLooking back at Liverpool Biennial 2016Trevor Shimizu @ 47 Canal reviewed<i>Peachtree Industrial</i> @ Bodega reviewedLooking back at Liste 2016An interview with Francesca GavinThe future is only an extension of our past: BB9 + beyondIntroducing the <i>Vaporents</i> exhibition with a mix for <i>aqnb</i>An interview with Warren NeidichAn interview with Kate Sansom<i>INFO PURA</i> @ The Residence Gallery reviewedAn interview Sanna Helena BergerBorna Sammak @ American Medium reviewedPremiering Celyn June’s <i>Location</i>An interview with Keren CytterBerlin Biennale 2016 reviewedSarah M Harrison’s <i>All The Things</i> reviewed

Latest

  • New York-based artist Mia Ardito and Chicago-based artist Maire Witt O’Neill are obsessed with reality and how self-reflexive it becomes when seen through the eye of the lens. Together they hang, like two mirrors facing each other opposite two walls, endlessly reflecting their image and whatever crosses between them. Throughout the past three years Sad Girls Club TV has been standing there staring, while Ardito and O’Neill reflect its image back and forth so much that one couldn’t tell where the show ends and they begin.
    Now in its fourth season, the project —having been developed over the last three years —uses the medium of television as a model…

  • New York-based artists Loney Abrams and Johnny Stanish are known for their work together as Hotel Art, a curatorial platform focused on temporary exhibitions in non-art spaces like banks, Dunkin’ Donuts, and Dodger Stadium. For their current joint exhibition So much dirt but not enough soil at Queens’ Knockdown Center, running July 9 to August 7, the duo continues to explore their affinity for makeshift spaces by setting up shop in a 113-year-old stone building, originally built as part of a glass factory. Distributed across three rooms –one being set outdoors under a fully eroded roof –their work here both enacts a form of…

  • With the accelerated pace of commodification and consumption of marginal identities (and spaces) globally, comes the question of, and tension between complicity and resistance in political art and social critique. Discourse is developing beyond ideas of visibility and representation to notions of assimilation into existing cultural paradigms, which is why AQNB was in Los Angeles to present the ‘Accessing Economies: Engagement & Withdrawal’ screening and reading at Club Pro LA on July 17 to interrogate the politics of identity within commercial or institutional spheres. 

    It’s part of an ongoing series of screening, reading, performance and discussion events lead by editor Jean Kay and organised in collaboration with video production partners Video in Common, and follows similar events already held in…

  • Megan Rooney‘s solo show, Animals on the bed runs at Seventeen Gallery in London between June 3 and July 23, 2016.
    A collection of paintings, sculptures, sounds, words and murals occupy the space by creating a sense of floating and providing the viewer with unfolding and recurring encounters of various characters, depicted within the works. The London-based artist’s practice is often filled by soft and grotesque figures, presented on large and spacious backgrounds within mushy blue and pink environments.
    Megan Rooney, ‘Moons and salads’ (2016). Installation view. Courtesy the artist + Seventeen Gallery, London.
    For Animals on the bed Rooney marks the gallery space as “foreign territory”, where contrasting physical and emotional states…

  • Femke Herregraven’s work is rooted in the tension between the material and the digital. Coming from a design background, the Amsterdam-based artist started travelling to remote offshore locations with the intention of mapping and making visible the infrastructures of financial markets; the ones kept away from the public eye. They’re what she calls “geographies of avoidance”, in an interview conducted through Skype from her location in the Netherlands capital, and they’re a part of the transatlantic cable communication network, begun in 1854 and triggered by engineers and financiers.
    I’d come across Herregraven’s work at a panel discussion at this year’s Transmediale 2016, in Febuary where…

  • If you exit Liverpool Airport, you might encounter a large steel cartoon-like vessel penned in amongst the taxi ranks and railings. It is one of many annoying public memorializations to local icons The Beatles that litter the city far and wide. I remember it from growing up in Merseyside, a weird vehicle to now see at an airport. I take a picture of it waiting for the bus, on my way to the 9th edition of Liverpool Biennial, running July 9 to October 16, 2016. The subject of a 1968 animated movie The Yellow Submarine, this human scale model used to be located in…