Amalia Ulman

Polyphonic POV’s in subjectivized art at MoMAW’s Ministry of Internal Affairs. Intimacy as Text, Jan 26 – Apr 2

25 January 2017

The Ministry of Internal Affairs. Intimacy as Text group exhibition is on at Warsaw’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMAW), opening on January 26 and running to April 2.

Curated by Natalia Sielewicz — also responsible for 2014’s great Private Settings exhibition — the show features over 20 artists, all at different stages of their careers, including Hannah BlackDorota Gawęda + Eglė KulbokaitėChris KrausJaakko PallasvuoMegan RooneySteve RoggenbuckAgnieszka Polska, and Amalia Ulman among others.

The exhibition promises to showcase “a polyphony of voices in poetry and visual arts whose common mode of expression is a first-person narrative and a confessional character of statements, while self-representation in language becomes a discursive practice of reflection and questioning and struggle for the artist’s subjectivity.”

See the MoMAW website for more details.**

Dorota Gaweda + Egle Kulbokakaite, ‘SHE, A SKELETON’ (2015). Install view. Courtesy SNOlab.

 

 

 

Arcadia Missa + Supplement present Everyone is Rich Now Apparently, Jan 8 – 29

5 January 2017
Arcadia Missa and Supplement are presenting the Everyone is Rich Now Apparently group exhibition at New York’s 225 Canal Street, opening January 8 and running to January 29.
 
The show is shared between the two galleries, and features work by Aracadia Missa’s Amalia Ulman and Gaby Sahhar and Supplement’s Gabriella Boyd and Philomene Pirecki.
 
After the end of the show, the two London-based spaces will alternate using 255 Canal Street for further exhibitions, so keep an eye out for upcoming projects.
 
Visit the FB event page for details.**
Gabriella Boyd, (2016). Painting. Courtesy the artist.

Impakt Festival 2016, October 26 – 30

24 October 2016

Curators Barbara Cueto & Bas Hendrikx present Utrecht’s Impakt Festival 2016, opening October 26 and running to October 30.

The theme this year is ‘Authenticity?’ and ‘How To Stay Cool in the Post-Digital Age’. Bringing together diverse perspectives on these concepts from arts and technology, the event will be host to a long line-up of events, exhibitions, screenings, performances and talks that will respond to the way we present ourselves against the backdrop of a growing desire to remain authentic within a time where authorship is becoming increasingly irrelevant and indefinable.

Some notable events include three different screenings by Ben Rivers, performance (A)ROMA))NCE by Peter Sattler & Kristinn Gedmundsson, a lecture by Rob Horning on authenticity and domination, and exhibition Authenticity is Dead, Long Live Authenticity, featuring work by Oliver Laric, Amalia Ulman and Elise van Mourik, among many others.

See the Impakt Festival website for details.**

Ben Rivers, 'The Sky Trembles and the Earth is Afraid and the Two Eyes Are not Brothers' (2016). Film still. Courtesy the artist + Impakt Festival, Utrecht.
Ben Rivers, ‘The Sky Trembles and the Earth is Afraid and the Two Eyes Are not Brothers’ (2016). Film still. Courtesy the artist + Impakt Festival, Utrecht.

[In Confidence] @ As It Stands, Oct 7 – 20

6 October 2016

The [In Confidence] group exhibition is on at Los Angeles’ As It Stands, opening October 7 and running to October 20.

The show comes with little information in regards to the themes, aside from a list of artists — including Manuel Arturo Abreu, Cristine Brache, Devin Kenny, Winslow Laroche, Alec Recinos and Amalia Ulman —and a question that asks “What are you hiding?”.

That’s followed by a list of nine garbled lines of numerical and alphabetical characters that look like a encrypted code or a URL, followed by a “key” that says “confidence”. In this case the appropriate definition of the word is probably less about self assurance and more about secrecy.

See the FB event page for details.**

Cristine Brache, 'Nothing But Violence' (2016). Courtesy the artist + Team Gallery, New York.
Cristine Brache, ‘Nothing But Violence’ (2016). Courtesy the artist + Team Gallery, New York.

 

Amalia Ulman @ Arcadia Missa, Sep 30 – Nov 5

29 September 2016

Amalia Ulman is presenting solo exhibition Labour Dance at London’s Arcadia Missa, opening September 30 and running to November 5.

The artist, whose work often looks at power structures and their associated aesthetics, confronts her own privilege through a dramatisation of her own position, and one that the press release calls “a position of criticality not accessible to all.”

The new work will expand on previous online and IRL project Privilege (2016) that featured as part of the Berlin Bienniale. The accompanying text also includes a quote by feminist theorist Kristeva, “One does not give birth in pain, one gives birth to pain”. The title is two-fold, nodding to politics as well as women in labour.

Visit Arcadia Missa webpage for more details.**

Amalia Ulman, 'Privilege', (2016). Installation view. Courtesy the artist + Arcadia Missa, London; photo: Timo Ohler
Amalia Ulman, ‘Privilege’, (2016). Installation view. Courtesy the artist + Arcadia Missa, London; photo: Timo Ohler

Amalia Ulman @ Caribic residency, Apr 30 – May 1

29 April 2016

Amalia Ulman is taking part in the itinerant residency programme Caribic in Las Vegas, running April 30 to May 1.

Ulman is ‘Resident 60’ of the emergent “(2-day artish residency)” that has also hosted the likes of Puppies Puppies, Georgie Nettell and Luis Miguel Bendaña in various locations including Rome, Lisbon, Berlin and Thessaloniki. According to the website, Caribic “exists in the present moment”, moving from its most recent base in Athens, near Life Sport, to the Nevada United States capital to develop “uncorrupted and intuitive formats together with artists”.

There’s little information on the process and outcomes of the residency itself except that Ulman will be hosted by artist and curator Hans-Christian Dany and the findings following these short residencies are promised online at centerforrealgrowth.com, which you can apply to join via email on the website. 

Los Angeles-based Ulman’s career has gathered strength following her four-month durational Instagram performance ‘Excellences & Perfections’ (2014). She’s since presented solo exhibition The Destruction of Experience at Evelyn Yard, and participated in major art surveys like Electronic Superhighway at Whitechapel Gallery and Performing for the Camera at Tate Modern.

See the Caribic website for (limited) details.**

Performing for the Camera @ Tate Modern, Feb 18 – Jun 12

18 February 2016

The Performing for the Camera group exhibition is on at London’s Tate Modern, opening February 18 and running to June 12.

Featuring over 500 images, the show purports to explore photography as both performance and utility in a survey of works by artists including Yayoi Kusama, Marcel Duchamp, Cindy Sherman and Yves Klein.

Also included in the survey of “vintage prints, large scale works, marketing posters” is Amalia Ulman‘s ‘Excellences & Perfections’ four-month durational performance on Instagram.

See the Tate Modern website for details. **

Header image: Amalia Ulman, ‘Excellences & Perfections’ (Instagram Update, 1st June 2014) (2015).

Electronic Superhighway @ Whitechapel, Jan 28 – May 15

25 January 2016

A massive survey of the impact of the internet and computer technologies on art practice is happening at London’s Whitechapel Gallery opening on January 28 and running until May 15.

Electronic Superhighway will bring together over 100 artworks spanning four decades between 1966 and 2016. It will be curated in reverse, so that the viewer will walk progressively towards the most historical experiments in media and sensory technology.

The survey show will include work by Amalia Ulman, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, The Yes Men, Hito Steyerl, Ryan Trecartin, Olia Lialina, Lynn Hershman Leeson, who’s work Lorna was one of the first interactive installations, and Nam June Paik, from whose musings on the future of the internet and art in 1974 the show borrows its title.

See the Whitechapel’s event page for more details.**

Olia Liana, 'Summer' (2013). Courtesy the artist and artist-host websites
Olia Liana, ‘Summer’ (2013). Courtesy the artist and all artist-host websites.

Cookie Gate @ Ellis King (2015) exhibition photos

20 November 2015

Cookie Gate happened in Dublin’s Ellis King in July 2015 during a period in our making history where all information around an art work or its object is attached so loudly to it – where words around art are as redundant as they are needed. The work by the 32 artists, including Thea Govorchin, boychild and Kari Altmann addressed the moment of communication between art work and audience.  By thinking about the structures of desire inherent in looking at adverts (and Facebook art show press releases, for example) the show, which ran 10 July – 15 August, aimed to dissect what the press release referred to as the ‘pre-engagement’ part of expression. Do artists second-guess what to make for an audience? Is this a passive movement between consumption and outwards communication or is it transparent? If it is transparent is this because its ‘about’ giving in to desire and working with this also as a mode of identity making as an artist? What are the materials and material objects that get caught up in all of this? Maybe you just want a cookie, and another, and another.

Cookie Gate (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy the gallery Ellis King, Dublin.
Cookie Gate (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy the gallery Ellis King, Dublin.

The press release reads: “Corporations, brand names, and images become rituals, obsessions, and diversions. Consumption is made all but too easy”.

Amalia Ulman showed ‘Safety Net’ (2014) out of turquoise thongs attached together and spread across a garage door. The work is a weak safety net and possibly acts a little bit like desire does. Another piece that holds form and shape with tension was Dublin-based Fiona Hallinan’s ‘Pendants’ (2015). These are a group of necklaces made from objects the artist found while walking around and are pinned to the wall beautifully in diamond forms, as though on display in a jewellers with a black matte background and well lit. Gina Folly’s ‘Life’ (2014) and ‘Untitled (2015) are two tiny wax ears resting on the surface of a pillow, half-embedded; half-listening out. One ear was made last year and the other this year. You are slowly hearing and consuming more (everything) -that is all you are doing in Folly’s piece. Kari Altmann presents what looks like a portrait and upright miniature trampoline called ’Stretch, Flex and Extend’ (2015). Attached to the silver frame by bungees is an image of a cream or some pills with the word ‘extend’ on the front and a plant coming out of the top, shrouded in a cloud of mystic visible pink aroma. Altman’s piece is transparent. 

Amalia Ulman, 'Untitled (Safety Net)' (2014) Install view. Courtesy the gallery Ellis King, Dublin.
Amalia Ulman, ‘Untitled (Safety Net)’ (2014) Install view. Courtesy the gallery Ellis King, Dublin.

There are two works with faces with wide smiles and white teeth with braces. One is ‘Rigged V1’ (2015) by Auto-Italia‘s Kate Cooper and displays all at once an open mouth, a grimacing mouth that can’t talk for its braces and bridges, and an example or perhaps an offering of dental perfection.   

boychild’s ‘Patrick’ (unbound)’ and ‘wu (threshold)’ (both 2015) look like x-rays or an image that is trying to come through. They are haunting and minimal and un-clear. They are possibly the works that communicate the most about outwards communication:

“Sometimes we go shopping for bare necessities and sometimes we are looking for something to really really satisfy us”. **

Exhibition photos, top right.

 The Cookie Gate group exhibitino was on at Dublin’s Ellis King, running July 10 to August 15, 2015.

Header image: Adriana Minoliti, ‘Sexy’ (2015), courtesy the gallery, Ellis King, Dublin