Jeremy Shaw

Jeremy Shaw, Degenerative Imaging in the Dark (2015) exhibition photos

29 March 2016

Degenerative Imaging in the Dark, a solo exhibition by Berlin-based artist Jeremy Shaw, running at LambdaLambdaLambda from October 3 to November 6, 2016, combines a series of glow-in-the-dark vinyl cutouts activated by light and an ongoing video project which began in 2008. Inspired by the language of scientific and spiritual practices, the exhibition explores how transcendental experience is formed into a coherent language.

The prints sit between an aesthetic of health and pharmaceutical advertising and the commercially produced cosmic stickers. Fading in and out, they charge with light every 30 minutes. Three dimensional tomographic images, or SPECT scans produce renderings that look at blood flow and metabolism in the human brain as a result of mind altering substances. Ranging from ‘Drug Free’ to ‘3 Years of Cocaine’ and ‘8 Years Substance Abuse’, the titles of Shaw’s work made using the same technology explores the representation of neuroscience and the mapping of degeneration within the brain.

Jeremy Shaw, Degenerative Imaging in the Dark (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy LambdaLambdaLambda, Prishtina.
Jeremy Shaw, Degenerative Imaging in the Dark (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy LambdaLambdaLambda, Prishtina.

Alongside the scans, a video titled ‘This Transition Will Never End’ (2008-present) looks at the spiral as a way to talk about the portrayal of ephemerality. The project is ongoing and compiles footage that has been appropriated from television and cinema. As the film is constantly updated, a large compilation of vortex-related imagery becomes a catalogue of the varying styles used to depict the slippage of time. Through a variety of media, the Degenerative Imaging in the Dark expands on Shaw’s ongoing interest in the commonplace depictions of realities that are impossible to document.**

Exhibition photos, top right.

Header image: Jeremy Shaw, ‘Degenerative Imaging in the Dark’ (2015) Exhibition view. Courtesy König Galerie, Berlin.