Charles Teyssou

Appearing + reappearing in Emilie Pitoiset’s The Vanishing Lady window display at KLEMM’S, Mar 11 – Apr 22

9 March 2017

Emilie Pitoiset is presenting solo exhibition The Vanishing Lady at Berlin’s KLEMM’S, opening March 11 and running to April 22.

The Paris-based artist works across media to create ‘uncanny scenarios’ and ‘surrealist visuals’ that play a part in an ongoing narrative unfolding through a series of exhibitions and fictional characters. For this show, Pitoiset’s work will revolve around author of The Wizard of Oz Frank Lyman’s “most famous magic trick & window-display.”

The exhibition also includes a text by Pierre-Alexandre Matéos and Charles Teyssou, excerpted below:

“A model of bones and flesh is appearing and reappearing with constantly renewed outfits in a window’s display. Bound. Generate disruption, displacements and attract the eyes, push the on-looker to look again. Look again. Window-dresser is an art, not a fallacious art.”

See the KLEMM’S website for details.**

Emilie Pitoiset, ‘Strike a Pose,’ (2016). Installation view. Courtesy the artist + Klemm’s gallery, Berlin.
  share news item

Saint-Cirq Lapopie Biennale (2016) exhibition photos

19 October 2016
Mindy Rose Schwartz, 'Cabin', (2016). Installation view. Courtesy the artist.
Mindy Rose Schwartz, ‘Cabin’, (2016). Installation view. Courtesy the artist+ Saint-Cirq Lapopie Biennale.

The Saint-Cirq Lapopie Biennale was on at various locations around the French village from July 23 to 30, 2016.

Curated by Pierre-Alexandre Mateos and Charles Teyssou, the Biennale took place in a Potemkin village nestled on a hill in the stony region of Lot in south of France and featured work by US and French based artists Cédric Fargues, Aidan Koch, Richard Phillips, Bunny Rogers, Mindy Rose Schwartz and Anna Solal.

The site-specific work was installed in various public places in the area (abandoned house, church, street, cemetery) and explored the relative authenticity of this ‘perfect’ village, emphasizing its artificial Disney-ification within the idyllic pastoral vision; too unreal to live in, too authentic to erase.**

The Saint-Cirq Lapopie Biennale was on at various locations around the French village from July 23 to July 30, 2016.

Header image: Mindy Rose Schwartz, ‘Cabin’, (2016). Installation view. Courtesy the artist+ Saint-Cirq Lapopie Biennale.

  share news item

System of a Down @ Ellis King exhibition photos

16 October 2015

The organisers of large group show, System of a Down wanted to fit a different place into the space of Dublin’s Ellis King. They drew a plan based on St Patrick’s Cathedral, and laid it over the plan of space and made new, imaginary rooms. From there, and during the week-long installation process, the press release tells, Francisco Cordero-Oceguera, Emanuele Marcuccio (both of whom also made work for the show), Pierre-Alexandre Mateos, Michele D’Aurizio and Charles Teyssou brought in some screens, scaffolding, monitors and projections. From there, artworks have been clustered together.

The show, which presents 47 works by 27 artists including Morag Keil, Puppies Puppies and Cindie Cheung has formed its meaning as it has physically unfolded. A bit like trying to work out a living space or a large communal house, decisions have been taken based on things contained inside the walls of the gallery, rubbing against one another, and also inside the invisible walls of the conflicting imagined architecture. The press release emphasises that a large part of the exhibition, which runs September 12 to October 17 is about the “inevitable aesthetic sensibilities of each organiser”, something that combined with the bizarre self-restricting and yet non-existent physical framework of the show’s interior calls into question the role and power of the curator. Joining up the dots seems difficult here, importantly.

Morag Keil + Nicolas Ceccaldi, 'Garbage World' (2010) Install view. Courtesy Ellis King, Dublin.
Morag Keil + Nicolas Ceccaldi, ‘Garbage World’ (2010) Install view. Courtesy Ellis King, Dublin.

Many of the works selected for the organisers to shape are maybe like dots themselves –as opposed to dots being micro-themes and curatorial agendas. The most striking and tender piece is ‘Table Work’ (2011 – 14) by Yugi Agematsu. Five cupcake wrappers are laid out open like flowers sat strangely apart from each other on a low table but definitely held together –not least by their colour range which goes from cream (vanilla?) to bright red (strawberry…). Another by Vito Acconci arranges three drawings of the same scenario: a car being born out of a boat, or a boat being born out of a car and flying into the sea, or flying out of the sea. These works are mini assemblages and require within them a formation. Quasar Kahn’s inflatable ceiling light sits on the floor, while Morag Keil and Nicolas Ceccaldi’s piece, ‘Garbage World’ (2010) features “fake birds” perched on the edge of a bin full of fake rubbish. Jason Benson and Erin Jane Nelson‘s vertical and fragile assemblages called ‘Bpuschy1’ and ‘2’ maybe capture System of a Down best via their hanging yet “emphatically woven junk”. **

Exhibition photos, top right.

System of a Down was on at Dublin’s Ellis King from September 12 to October 17, 2015.

Header image: System of A Down (2015). Exhibition view. Courtesy Ellis King, Dublin.  

  share news item