A
Marc Kokopeli, 'Untitled' (2016). Install view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
B
Dangling in the romp (2017). Exhibition view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
C
Marc Kokopeli, 'Untitled' (2016). Installation view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
D
Dangling in the romp (2017). Exhibition view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
E
Dangling in the romp (2017). Exhibition view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
F
Amy​ Yao,​ 'This City is Everywhere, This City is Nowhere, No. 1' (2016). Installation view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
G
Dangling in the romp (2017). Exhibition view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
H
Brian Fuata, 'Care Disfigurements' (2016). Install view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
I
Brian Fuata, 'Care Disfigurements' (2016). Install view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
J
Megan Plunkett, 'The Still Brave Dog' (2016). Install view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
K
Zac Segbedzi, 'A love supreme for mein kind of blue kampf; jana + jenny' (2016). Install view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.
L
Dangling in the romp (2017). Exhibition view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.

Road trips gone wrong + suburban horror in Dangling in the romp at Australia’s Pet Projects

, 3 March 2017

The Dangling in the romp group exhibition was on at Perth, Western Australia’s Pet Projects, opening December 23 and running to February 28.

Dangling in the romp (2017). Exhibition view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.

Organised by George Egerton-Warburton and featuring the work of Anonymous, Brian Fuata, Marc Kokopeli, Megan Plunkett, Zac Segbedzi and Amy Yao, the show’s press release comes with a photo of a berry farm residence in the town of Silvan in the Australian state of Victoria. It’s a photo of a home that refers to an eerie account of a real-life urban legend of the Tromp family.

“City folk head into the bush and get lost, metaphorically and physically,” writes Chris Johnston, author of the Sydney Morning Herald article featured in the exhibition text. The piece places the event — where the Tromp’s went missing in the Australian wilderness, only to be found with little recollection of what transpired — in a pop cultural and historical context of toxic masculinity and European colonialism.**

The Dangling in the romp group exhibition was on at Perth’s Pet Projects, running December 23 and running to February 28, 2017.

LT presents Anonymous @ Southbank Centre, Mar 29

29 March 2016

The Dangling in the romp group exhibition was on at Perth, Western Australia’s Pet Projects, opening December 23 and running to February 28.

Dangling in the romp (2017). Exhibition view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.

Organised by George Egerton-Warburton and featuring the work of Anonymous, Brian Fuata, Marc Kokopeli, Megan Plunkett, Zac Segbedzi and Amy Yao, the show’s press release comes with a photo of a berry farm residence in the town of Silvan in the Australian state of Victoria. It’s a photo of a home that refers to an eerie account of a real-life urban legend of the Tromp family.

“City folk head into the bush and get lost, metaphorically and physically,” writes Chris Johnston, author of the Sydney Morning Herald article featured in the exhibition text. The piece places the event — where the Tromp’s went missing in the Australian wilderness, only to be found with little recollection of what transpired — in a pop cultural and historical context of toxic masculinity and European colonialism.**

The Dangling in the romp group exhibition was on at Perth’s Pet Projects, running December 23 and running to February 28, 2017.

Fake @ Exile Berlin, Mar 21 – Apr 18

20 March 2015

The Dangling in the romp group exhibition was on at Perth, Western Australia’s Pet Projects, opening December 23 and running to February 28.

Dangling in the romp (2017). Exhibition view. Courtesy Pet Projects, Perth.

Organised by George Egerton-Warburton and featuring the work of Anonymous, Brian Fuata, Marc Kokopeli, Megan Plunkett, Zac Segbedzi and Amy Yao, the show’s press release comes with a photo of a berry farm residence in the town of Silvan in the Australian state of Victoria. It’s a photo of a home that refers to an eerie account of a real-life urban legend of the Tromp family.

“City folk head into the bush and get lost, metaphorically and physically,” writes Chris Johnston, author of the Sydney Morning Herald article featured in the exhibition text. The piece places the event — where the Tromp’s went missing in the Australian wilderness, only to be found with little recollection of what transpired — in a pop cultural and historical context of toxic masculinity and European colonialism.**

The Dangling in the romp group exhibition was on at Perth’s Pet Projects, running December 23 and running to February 28, 2017.